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Category: Non-fiction

Current TBR

Rich People Problems by Kevin Kwan I intend to finish the Crazy Rich Asians trilogy. I liked the first one but didn’t like the second one. I’m curious as to how the third one would be. I’m definitely reading it this weekend. Lost in Math by Sabine Hossenfelder As a physics major who thinks math is beautiful, the subtitle “How beauty leads physics astray” was enough for me to be intrigued. I am very excited that my city’s library had it. I Am the Messenger by Markus Zusak Since I loved The Book Thief, I thought I’d try another one of Zusak’s book. I hope this one is as good! The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran This is a very famous book and it was recommended and gifted to me by a very experienced person so I decided to read it now. White Tiger This was at a used book store for less than a dollar! Knowing how praised it is, I picked it up instantly. I am dying to find out for myself why it’s so praise-worthy.

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5 Books Being Released in 2019 That I’m Excited For

1. On the Come Up by Angie Thomas

Sixteen-year-old Bri wants to be one of the greatest rappers of all time. Or at least win her first battle. As the daughter of an underground hip hop legend who died right before he hit big, Bri’s got massive shoes to fill.
But it’s hard to get your come up when you’re labeled a hoodlum at school, and your fridge at home is empty after your mom loses her job. So Bri pours her anger and frustration into her first song, which goes viral…for all the wrong reasons.
Bri soon finds herself at the center of a controversy, portrayed by the media as more menace than MC. But with an eviction notice staring her family down, Bri doesn’t just want to make it—she hasto. Even if it means becoming the very thing the public has made her out to be.  
Insightful, unflinching, and full of heart, On the Come Up is an ode to hip hop from one of the most influential literary voices of a generation. It is the story of fighting for your dreams, even as the odds are stacked against you; and about how, especially for young black people, freedom of speech isn’t always free.

Harper Collins
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